LG Chem Announces Flexible OLED Panels Making of Plastic Films

The OLED Light Division of LG Chem has stated that it has completed the development of its new plastic film type flexible OLED panels. The panels are manufactured through new processes and technologies using plastic films which enable the panels to be lighter and truly flexible.

The truly flexible characteristics will enable unprecedented luminary designs and even wall paper lighting, as well as new lighting applications for automotive and airplane industry.

Technologically, transparent polyimide substrate enables the panel to emit light towards bottom side; a new substrate coating technology has been applied to reduce costs; and additional barrier technologies have been utilized to prevent material degradation against the permeation of water vapor and oxygen.

LG Chem is planning to put this new film type flexible OLED panel into mass production in the first half of 2015, which is expected to create significant opportunities for developing the market.

Disclaimers of Warranties
1. The website does not warrant the following:
1.1 The services from the website meets your requirement;
1.2 The accuracy, completeness, or timeliness of the service;
1.3 The accuracy, reliability of conclusions drawn from using the service;
1.4 The accuracy, completeness, or timeliness, or security of any information that you download from the website
2. The services provided by the website is intended for your reference only. The website shall be not be responsible for investment decisions, damages, or other losses resulting from use of the website or the information contained therein<
Proprietary Rights
You may not reproduce, modify, create derivative works from, display, perform, publish, distribute, disseminate, broadcast or circulate to any third party, any materials contained on the services without the express prior written consent of the website or its legal owner.

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. just announced that it now has a full lineup of high-power LEDs with the introduction of its new 5W-class LH351C, which follows its LH351B (3W) and LH351D (10W) offerings.

READ MORE

Do you go to the movies regularly? Then you have most likely followed the transformation over the past ten years when the first movie theatres moved to digital projection. Laser projectors have been in use since 2015.

READ MORE