Advanced Efficiency of Perovskite LEDs Achieved with Interlayer Reaction

Scientists at Linkoping University working with colleagues from China have shown how to achieve efficient perovskite LEDs. In an article published in Nature Communications, they provide guidelines on fabricating high-quality perovskite light emitters for high-efficiency perovskite LEDs.

Since solution-processed perovskites contain large amounts of defects, which are mostly halide vacancies, efficient control of the perovskite crystallinity is required for high-performance optoelectronic devices. The research group at LiU, under the leadership of Senior Lecturer Feng Gao, in collaboration with scientists from Nanjing Tech University, and Soochow University in China, has now studied how the precursor components and the interfaces affect the crystallization process of perovskites.


(Image: Charlotte Perhammar/LiU)

"We and several other groups found that simply introducing an extra amount of organic halides in the precursor can help to passivate the defects and achieve highly emissive perovskite films" says Zhongcheng Yuan, PhD student in Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM) at LiU, who is the first author of the article. The excess organic halides, however, hamper the perovskite crystallization, resulting in low-conductivity perovskite emissive layers and poor-performance LEDs.

The scientists have now resolved this dilemma by supporting the perovskite crystallization with a metal oxide, ZnO, which helps to remove a suitable number of the extra organic cations, making it possible for better crystallization. The article in Nature Communications shows how chemical reactions between different metal oxide layers and perovskite layers affect the properties of the thin films of perovskites, and consequently the performance of LEDs.

This new discovery, in combination with previous results from the same group on dealing with defects in perovskites, has allowed them to fabricate efficient perovskite light-emissive films in the laboratory. The resulting devices give near-infrared LEDs with a quantum efficiency of 19.6%, i.e. 19.6% of the electrons supplied to the device are emitted as light (photons), which is among the best performance for perovskite LEDs in the world.

Disclaimers of Warranties
1. The website does not warrant the following:
1.1 The services from the website meets your requirement;
1.2 The accuracy, completeness, or timeliness of the service;
1.3 The accuracy, reliability of conclusions drawn from using the service;
1.4 The accuracy, completeness, or timeliness, or security of any information that you download from the website
2. The services provided by the website is intended for your reference only. The website shall be not be responsible for investment decisions, damages, or other losses resulting from use of the website or the information contained therein<
Proprietary Rights
You may not reproduce, modify, create derivative works from, display, perform, publish, distribute, disseminate, broadcast or circulate to any third party, any materials contained on the services without the express prior written consent of the website or its legal owner.

Nichia’s Tunable 757 receives rave reviews from industry leaders, including the coveted LpS Best Sustainability Technology Award. Nichia, the leader in and inventor of the high-brightness LED, announced its game-changing single LES, tuna... READ MORE

Innovative tunable white, mid-power LED enables luminaire manufacturers to improve colour tuning, shrink optics and fixture profiles, while enabling new design options. Nichia, the leader in and inventor of the high-brightness LED, announces i... READ MORE